Maine

Unveiling event

Maine SuperGraphic honoring Ice Age Trail unveiled during Maine’s Ice Age Trail Map Celebration

U-Haul Company of New Hampshire and the U-Haul Media and Public Relations Department teamed up with the University of Maine on October 2, 2006 during Maine’s Ice Age Trail Map Celebration to unveil the latest SuperGraphic, representing the state of Maine. Area District Vice President (ADVP) Jon G. Hynes (District 9) spoke to an excited crowd of more than 300 people before the veil was drawn and Maine’s Ice Age Trail and marine marvel SuperGraphic was officially revealed to the public.

Hynes presented a special plaque to Harold Borns, professor of geological sciences and a member of the University of Maine’s Climate Change Institute. Borns, who lent his expertise, research and guidance to help create the vibrant image of Maine’s Ice Age Trail, has done a majority of his research along the east coast of Maine. Borns has developed more than 40 potential sites along Maine’s Ice Age Trail, all based on research he has done in Maine over the past 30 years. Hynes also presented plaques to 14 other special guests who attended the unveiling: Governor John Baldacci; State Senator Elizabeth Schneider; a representative of State Senator Olympia Snow; a representative of State Senator Susan Collins; a representative of Congressman Mike Michaud; Robert Kennedy, president, University of Maine; Dr. Woodrow Thompson, geologist, Maine Geological Survey; Pamela Person, executive committee member, Maine Global Climate Change; Gary Edwards, coordinator, Down East Resource, conservation and development unit of the U.S.D.A.; Paul Mayewski, director, Climate Change Institute; Joe Carr, director of University Relations, University of Maine; James Ward, executive director, Research and Economic Development; Deborah Seymour, Climate Change Institute, University of Maine; and Michael Herman, University of Maine.

U-Haul selected Maine’s Ice Age Trail because the landscape of Maine tells a unique story of an unknown past world. 18,000 years ago, during the last ice age, a vast continental glacier still covered what would become the state of Maine, and extended out into what is now the Gulf of Maine in the Atlantic Ocean. Maine’s ice-age marine world was like no other environment in the United States..

Watch the Unveiling Event Video


U-Haul EL to be unveiled.


Jon Hynes, area district vice president (District 9), presents Governor John Baldacci with a plaque representing Maine’s SuperGraphic.


Governor John Baldacci and Hal Borns, professor emeritus of glacial and quaternary geology chair, Maine’s Ice Age Trail, prepare to sign the U-Haul truck.


Jon Hynes, area district vice president (District 9), signing the truck.


Dr. Woodrow Thompson, geologist, Maine Geological Survey signing the truck.


Deborah Seymour, Climate Change Institute, signing the truck.


(Left to Right) Robert Kennedy, president, University of Maine; State Senator Elizabeth Schneider; ADVP Jon Hynes (District 9); Governor John Baldacci; Pamela Person, executive committee member, Maine Global Climate Change; Hal Borns; representative for State Senator Olympia Snow, Michael Herman, University of Maine; Woodrow Thompson and Gary Edwards, coordinator, Down East Resource, Conservation and Development Unit of the U.S.D.A.


Joe Carr, director of University Relations, University of Maine; Deborah Seymour; James Ward, executive director, Research and Economic Development; representative for Congressman Mike Michaud; representative for State Senator Susan Collins; Robert Kennedy; State Senator Elizabeth Schneider; Jon Hynes; Governor John Baldacci; Pamela Person and Hal Borns.


Ashleigh Wagner, U-Haul Media and Public Relations specialist; Joanne Fried, director of Media and Public Relations, and ADVP Jon Hynes (District 9).


Governor John Baldacci and Hal Borns cutting the cake, honoring Maine’s Ice Age Trail.


Maine’s Ice Age Trail and marine marvels are ready to journey across America on the sides of more than 1,200 U-Haul EL trucks.


The mold of a remarkably preserved walrus skull with the tusks intact dates back 14,000 years.


View from the top of Cadillac Mountain, which was possibly the first surface of modern Maine to emerge from the ice about 17,000 years ago.